A guide to understanding Digital Experience Management

20 Jun 2019

  • Customer experience
  • Technology
  • Content
  • Marketing Technology

Web Content Management systems (WCM) have had to change and evolve. Consumers’ desire for personalised experiences means these tools must call on data from external sources to tailor the customer journey. And advanced analytics capabilities are needed so website operators can ensure their content is delivering the desired conversion results.

When brought together, the need to provide more personalised experiences utilising greater and more varied data sources across a wider range of touchpoints has led to fundamental rethink of WCM systems – one that places the customer experience at the heart of the interaction, rather than the content. And it must tackle the fundamental idea that many digital interactions may not even touch the traditional visual Web.

This new breed of web and digital experience management platform can perform many of the functions of a traditional WCM, such as providing an environment for the rapid creation, review and publishing of content assets. They also have an expanded capability in terms of the digital assets they manage and might include those destined for non-visual interfaces (often called headless assets) such as chatbots.

The Australian market today contains a wide variety of WCM suppliers, starting with basic site builder services such as Wix and WordPress and moving up through more advanced open source tools such as Joomla and Drupal. At the higher end of the market are enterprise Web Management Systems (WMS) from suppliers such as Adobe, Sitecore and Oracle.

The Australian market today contains a wide variety of WCM suppliers, starting with basic site builder services such as Wix and WordPress and moving up through more advanced open source tools such as Joomla and Drupal. At the higher end of the market are enterprise Web Management Systems (WMS) from suppliers such as Adobe, Sitecore and Oracle.

Australia is a mature market, and home to many examples of organisations that are at the leading edge of technology utilisation across industries such as financial services, retail and other service providers.

Who uses a Digital Experience Platform?

Experience management platforms can be used by anyone who operates a web page, although the complexity of the tools can vary remarkably. The sophistication of the tools used generally aligns with the percentage of interactions that are driven through digital channels. Hence strong adoption of advanced tools can be found in market segments such as retail, banking and finance, education, healthcare, utilities, government services, and more.

The need to provide a broader digital experience for engaging with consumers through additional channels such as wearables and chatbots is a new phenomenon, and so few organisations have fully adopted this aspect of web and digital experience management.

However, these capabilities are now a high priority, especially amongst enterprise customers and those that engage via a digital-first model. Hence we expect to see a surge in the use of experience management platforms as brands seek to meet their customers on any device with a consistent experience.

To gain a simple understanding of Digital Experience Platforms, download the recent Tech Guide produced by ADMA’s sister association Digital + Technology Collective in partnership with Adobe.

Download Tech Guide: Web + Digital Manager

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